Panoramic view of the Royal Palace, Oslo, Norway

Oslo, the Last Capital

Author: Sue Rogers
Date: 18th March 2022

Oslo, the Capital of Norway

Oslo is my last European capital to visit. It's not exactly charming, like Bergen, but it's a small and sweet. A pleasant and easy place. It's spacious, with plenty of green areas. And the city is shown to good effect under cloudless skies.

Norway’s ancient capital wasn’t always called Oslo. Founded in 1040, its name was originally spelt Ânslo or Áslo. In 1624, a great fire destroyed large parts of the city, and it was decided to rebuild it closer to the Akershus Fortress. At the same time its name was changed to Christiania, in honour of the ruling monarch, King Christian IV. Between 1814 and 1905, Norway and Sweden were united in one kingdom and Oslo was the co-official capital, with Stockholm. In 1925, the city was renamed Oslo.

I've been wandering for about ten miles. Partly because the weather is good, partly because I get to see a lot more, and partly because I can't work out how to buy a tram ticket without downloading an app or opening a credit account. You can't pay on board. And also because I didn't pick the most logical route. I'm blaming Google.

Oslo Cathedral

Oslo Cathedral isn't the grandest building I've ever seen, but it's the building used to host all the main ceremonies required of the Church of Norway, like royal weddings. It dates from the late1600s, but was partially rebuilt in the nineteenth century.

Around The Royal Palace

South of the cathedral is Eidsvollsplass, running into Wesellsplass, a magnificent square and park lined with grand buildings, theatres and hotels. The park was preserved not so much for aesthetic reasons; it was more a case of NIMBY. The owners of the stately mansions didn't want tall buildings opposite them. To the north is the parliament building, the Stortinget, with its half rotunda. The parliament has only one voting house - a system known as unicameralism.

In the centre of the grassed area, statues and monuments and an outdoor skating rink, only open at the weekend. To the south, the National Theatre (Ibsen is often performed here) and the Royal Palace (Slottet) and Park. The Slottet is reached by steep steps and you're greeted by a statue of King Karl Johan in Palace Square. The palace was built for him (and he gave his name to the long street I've just walked along), but he died before it was finished in the 1840s. It's a smaller version of Buckingham Palace, though you can get much closer here. You're allowed to tour at weekends.

The Nobel Peace Centre, Oslo

Swedish chemist Alfred Nobel (1833 - 1896), the inventor of dynamite, bequeathed the funds to found the Nobel Prizes. He stipulated that the annual presentation of the peace prize should take place in Oslo. (The other four- now five- prizes are given in Stockholm.) No-one is quite sure why he made this choice, but the kingdoms of Norway and Sweden were united, during his lifetime. The Peace Centre, a converted railway station, mounts exhibitions, offers tours and hosts peace related debates. It is right on the harbour, on the Aker Brygge, looking over the Oslo Fjord, along with a scattering of fish restaurants.

The Oslo Radhuset

The Nobel Peace Prizes are actually presented annually, in December, in the imposing Oslo City Hall (Radhuset), just over the road. It is striking rather than attractive, built of large medieval style red bricks and has two colossal towers. The eastern tower has a carillon set of 49 bells.

The Akershus Fortress and Old Town

It's a peaceful walk along the quayside, past moored schooners and brigs and some colourful warehouses. further round, the Akershus Fortress and old town, around which the new Christiana was constructed. The old town was always known as Oslo, though most of the sights, mainly churches, are now in ruins. The original medieval castle was built in the thirteenth century, but since then it has been transformed first into a fortress and then into a renaissance palace and residence of the royal family. It's open to the public, but only at weekends at the moment.

The National Opera and Ballet Building

The National Opera and Ballet building dominates the next section of dockside. It's-cunningly designed to mirror the plates of ice on the finger of fjord on which it stands. Steep paths and walkways lead up to viewing platforms, on the top decks.

The Munch Museum

Next to the Opera House is the Munch Museum, Oslo's very recent version of Tate Modern. There was a competition for the design and the project was put on hold at least once, due to budget wrangling. There is a great of plate glass and long escalators, leading you to the various exhibitions and views across the harbour and the city. Not everyone loves the winning design. According to Wikipedia, it has been branded the unofficial world's largest collection of guard rails.

As you would expect, most of the paintings on display were executed by Edvard Munch. He was extremely prolific; the museum owns 26.000 of his works. The Scream, his iconic piece, takes pride of place. Most of us can identify with the anguished subject. But fewer folk would know that there were actually four copies of the Scream made - two paintings and two pastels. The museum owns three of them and rotates these on the display. One copy of the Scream was famously stolen in 2004, but the police managed to get it back. The museum is busy, even though the streets are quiet and you have to crane your neck to get a view.

Other modern and impressionist painters also feature - Dali, Picasso, Magritte.

Vigeland Sculpture Park

Back past the palace and park, through the city centre, down the lengthy Karl Johans Gate mainly pedestrianized street (1200 metres long), lined with small shops. and by the cathedral again, into the suburbs of Uranienborg. Large affluent wooden structures and peaceful streets. It's a two mile stroll to the Vigeland Sculpture Park, set within the largest green space in Oslo, the Frogner Park.

Norwegian sculptor, Gustav Vigeland has assembled 200 sculptures to represent the cycle of human life. It's the largest sculpture park by a single artist in the world and it's entertaining, rather than enchanting. Surrounding the park are various enormous sports halls, skating and swimming, and further south, on a little peninsula is The Viking Ship Museum. But it's closed. (very) long term for renovation.

Tea at the Bristol

The Hotel Bristol isn't quite Claridge's, but the wintergarden restaurant is posh and expensive. Mind you, everywhere in Oslo is expensive. It's the second most expensive city in the world (according to one list- they're all different). The country has the fourth-highest per-capita income in the world.

There are chandeliers, arches and panelled gilded ceilings. And plenty of well heeled ladies eating cakes from silver tiered stands. Afternoon tea is 490 krone (over 40 pounds) so I reckon it will have to serve for dinner as well. Teeny cakes, a macaron, finger sandwiches and freshly baked scones with clotted cream and lemon curd. I wonder if that would be allowed in Devon?

The place where I'm staying, a sister hotel to the Bristol, on the same block, isn't Claridge's either. But the rooms are Scandi and elegant, with a squeezing of lime. The staff are exceptionally friendly and helpful. And it boasts it has the best breakfast in Oslo. They may be right. It's a glorious buffet selection. Like most places in Oslo they all speak good English. (Most of the signage is in English too). I've also noticed in some restaurants, that the common language amongst the multi lingual staff is English.

From the Airport to Oslo

A taxi from Gardermoen Airport to the city centre is 100 euros and it takes an hour. The airport train takes 20 minutes and is about 20 euros. It's a no brainer. Though Google not having its finest hour in Oslo and tells me that my hotel is 3. 5 kilometres from the station, so I take a taxi. That's another 20 euros. Even when I discover that its actually only half a mile and the streets are reasonably flat. Which is why I'm wheeling my trolley case through a dark and chilly Oslo at 5 in the morning to get the train and then the plane to Stockholm.

The train is super efficient. You can even scan your boarding pass and print out your bag tag. And you only have to be at the airport an hour before take off. I hope.

Read more tales from Norway here.

Join the discussion, leave a comment

Been there? Something to add? Want some advice? Just want to say Hello? Get in touch…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

hello world!

Newsletter Subscription

Stay in touch. Get travel tips, updates on my latest adventures and posts on out of the way places, straight to your Inbox.

I keep your data private and only share your data with third parties that make this service possible. Privacy Policy. No spam I promise. Unsubscribe any time.